Thinking Sensing and Behaving

When you talk with a friend, understanding and responding to what they say requires communication between two distant areas of your brain. These areas — one responsible for understanding language and another for producing speech — communicate with each other via a bundle of axons called the arcuate fasciculus, pictured above.
When you talk with a friend, there is a separate conversation going on in your brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Whether they end up feathered, scaled, or hairy, all animals start out as a smooth ball of cells known as an embryo.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Click the buttons below for an assortment of videos and articles to learn some of the facts, myths, and long-term effects of alcohol.  
  • BrainFacts/SfN
New neuroscience discoveries are happening every day. Help your students learn how to spot trustworthy science in a news article.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
There’s no mistaking a broken heart for a broken bone — but our brains might look at both kinds of pain the same way.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The holidays are an excuse to enjoy your favorite treats! But what happens to your brain when you over-indulge?
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Research in rats suggests excessive media consumption at a young age can hurt brain development.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
This simple illusion tells us a lot about how we process vision.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Your brain births new cells all the time. Here’s how it works.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
When you’re asleep, your brain is doing important work:consolidating your memories.
  • The Brain Prize
  • 8 min
These cells connect your eyes and your brain to creative your sense of vision.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Learn about aphantasia and your "mind's eye" in this video.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 4 min
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 5 min