Thinking Sensing and Behaving

When you talk with a friend, understanding and responding to what they say requires communication between two distant areas of your brain. These areas — one responsible for understanding language and another for producing speech — communicate with each other via a bundle of axons called the arcuate fasciculus, pictured above.
When you talk with a friend, there is a separate conversation going on in your brain.
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Jazz musician Pat Metheny and neuroscientist Charles Limb find a common note in the keys of improv.
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Your brain changes as you grow, but what happens after the growth spurt? Neuroscientist Nick Spitzer debunks the myth that your brain is done maturing after the teen years.
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  • 1 min
It isn’t just your ears that allow you to hear, or just your eyes that allow you to see — it’s your brain.
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Neuroscientist Nick Spitzer tells you the truth.
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  • 1 min
Bundles of extra-long axons transmit signals from eyes to brain.
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Neurons and muscles communicate at specialized nodes called neuromuscular junctions.
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Neuroscientist Jamie Hanson encourages scientists to look at people and situations that fall outside so-called societal norms.
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  • 9 min
Neuroscientist Jamie Hanson encourages scientists to look at people and situations that fall outside so-called societal norms.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 9 min
Jet lag, irregular sleep schedules, and exposure to artificial light throw our internal clocks out of whack. When that happens, our health suffers.
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Sun-seeking brain cells keep the sleep cycle in balance.
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This twist on a classic party game will test your students’ brain anatomy knowledge.
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The release of the “vampire hormone” lets the body know when it’s time to sleep.
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