Image of pioneer cells
These trailblazers strike out into various parts of the brain, laying down axons as they go.
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Your selections: Anatomy
Soft sounds and gentle touches can trigger so-called “brain tingles.” Here’s why.
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Humans can find faces in many things because of our fusiform gyrus.
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The brain’s fusiform face area helps you find your friend in a crowd.
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Genes, hormones, and gender identity can shape our brains, but many studies of sex differences in the brain fail to account for these factors.
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Our knack for recognizing faces helps us communicate with those around us and learn about our environment.
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The brain stores memories by changing how neurons talk to each other.
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For some, the lack of fans might relieve performance anxiety or hurt motivation. But those at the top of their game likely aren’t fazed.
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A mutation in the RORB gene leads to low levels of a spinal cord protein and impedes hopping.
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For many people, the winter poses an onslaught of a seasonal depression known as seasonal affective disorder, or SAD.
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Special brain waves during sleep separate information to remember from what’s worth forgetting — unless the brainstem gets in the way.
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Active and physically fit kids have healthier brains than their more sedentary peers.
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A cluster of neurons in the brain’s fear center may drive our innate fear of heights.
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