Emotions, Stress & Anxiety

Image of children with drawn faces on paper in front of their faces
It’s hard to describe what an emotion is — let alone how many of them there are or whether everyone experiences the same ones. But we do know this: emotions arise from activity in distinct parts of the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Your selections: Emotions Stress and Anxiety
Twenty years of research have established the connection between adverse childhood experiences and long-term health. Now researchers are looking for ways to measure the biology behind the correlation and try to reverse it.
  • Knowable Magazine
Treating fears in a virtual environment could make therapies for phobias less difficult and more accessible.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Stories help people connect with each other and make sense of the world.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Scientists are beginning to unravel the science of so-called “brain tingles.”
  • BrainFacts/SfN
For many people, the winter poses an onslaught of a seasonal depression known as seasonal affective disorder, or SAD.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
A cluster of neurons in the brain’s fear center may drive our innate fear of heights.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
When light hits our eyes, it does more than help us see.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The phrase ‘starved for attention’ takes on real meaning for children experiencing the loneliness social distancing presents.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Once thought to merely coordinate movement, this region of the brain is proving to exert greater influence on cognition, emotion, and other functions.
  • Knowable Magazine
Contrary to popular depictions, love resides in the brain — not the heart.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Listening to music reduces anxiety, improves attention, and triggers endorphin release.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Having an audience affects your performance, for better or worse.
  • BrainFacts/SfN

3D Brain

An interactive brain map that you can rotate in a three-dimensional space.