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BrainFacts.org

Introduction

Might researchers one day design prosthetic limbs that respond to the brain’s signals? Will brain scans someday allow researchers to read a person’s thoughts? Recent advances in neuroscience are spurring the development of technology to address long-standing challenges. And the development of new technologies — such as ways to trace connections between our 100 billion nerve cells, decode activity patterns in neural circuits, and turn cells on and off with light — are guiding scientists to new understanding of the brain and nervous system. New technologies also aim to improve doctors’ abilities to diagnose neurological or psychiatric illness earlier and expand treatment options for people with brain disease or injury. For instance, therapies aimed at identifying and replacing defective genes or nerve cells are currently being tested. With each discovery, scientists uncover new details about brain function and how it differs in health and disease.

Discoveries

Source: Society for Neuroscience
Techniques that increase the resolution of microscopes are revolutionizing the ability to peer at brain structures in ever-increasing detail.
Source: Dana Foundation
The cochlear implant is a near-miraculous device, widely considered the most effective brain-machine interface technology yet developed. Now, researchers are working to make this very good implant even better.
Source: Society for Neuroscience
The discovery of a protein that gives jellyfish their colorful glow revolutionized scientists' view of the nervous system, allowing them to add color to what had only been seen in black and white.
Source: TED
Mice, bugs and hamsters are no longer the only way to study the brain. Functional MRI (fMRI) allows scientists to map brain activity in living, breathing, decision-making human beings.

Technologies in the News

Source: Medical Xpress
Date: 21 Oct 2014
Developing invisible implantable medical sensor arrays, a team of engineers has overcome a major technological hurdle in researchers' efforts to understand the brain.
Source: Chicago Tribune
Date: 15 Oct 2014
A machine that sends magnetic pulses into a patient's brain has become the new frontier of depression treatment.
Source: NPR Shots Blog
Date: 8 Oct 2014
This year's Nobel Prize in chemistry went to a team that came up with a way to take a closer look at the secret lives of living cells. It could make biomedical research a lot easier.
Search for a researcher with Find a Neuroscientist.