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BrainFacts.org

Introduction

Parents and physicians track when children reach developmental milestones. Sometimes, missing these targets or developing abnormal behaviors is an indication of a nervous system disorder and cause for evaluation by medical professionals. Scientists have strong evidence that some childhood disorders, including autism and Rett syndrome, are caused by impairments in brain development. Others such as attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are believed to be caused, in part, by abnormal brain cell activity. Human and animal research has shown that problems in genes, molecules, and cells contribute to various childhood disorders. These studies could one day lead to the development of new drugs or specialized education programs, and the early diagnosis of childhood disorders can help parents make informed decisions about treatment.

Discoveries

Source: Wellcome Trust
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a common mental health problem that severely disrupts people's lives. It is poorly understood and often dismissed as bad behaviour or laziness. Penny Bailey spoke with Anita Thapar about its genetic basis.
Source: Society for Neuroscience
Until recently, scientists believed inherited developmental brain disorders, such as fragile X syndrome, Rett syndrome, tuberous sclerosis, and autism, were caused by permanent brain abnormalities.
Source: Society for Neuroscience
Neuroscientist Damien Fair discusses how brain imaging is used to explore ways to better characterize developmental brain disorders like autism and ADHD.

Childhood Disorders in the News

Source: TIME
Date: 24 Nov 2014
The unknown cause of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) could be a brain abnormality, a new study suggests.
Source: Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative
Date: 15 Nov 2014

Children with autism show different patterns of brain activity during everyday gestures and movements than controls do, suggest unpublished results presented at Neuroscience 2014. 

Source: Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative
Date: 15 Nov 2014
Monkeys exposed in utero to their mother’s immune response to a mock infection show inflammation in their brains four years later.
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