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The giant sea slug Apylsia has a simple nervous system that makes them a useful model for neuroscience research. They also have rows of tiny sharp teeth, which cover a tongue-like structure.
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Computer models of proteins involved in metabolism, the chemical reactions that sustain life, help researchers understand how disease affects their function.
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Do lost connections between brain regions guarantee impaired function? Imaging techniques show normal functional activity in people with missing links, spurring scientists to say: not necessarily.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Star-shaped glial cells, sensibly named astrocytes, are found throughout the central nervous system. Scientists can use luminescence to make the cells actually glow as they communicate.
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How does the brain track smells? Scientists use the olfactory system in insects to study how the brain responds to and processes different odors.
Neurons in the eye turn light into electrical signals. How and where signals travel between these cells is thought to affect vision.
3D reconstructions reveal the detailed anatomy of three types of neurons in a mouse's cerebellum, an area of the brain that helps control movement.
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Glial cells provide insulation for nerve cells and help them communicate with one another. Using mouse muscle nerves, scientists studied the role of specific proteins in the growth of these cells.
  • BrainFacts/SfN