Animation of thought bubbles above a head
Discover the animal models that help us learn about different parts of the human brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN

Basic neuroscience research in animal models is essential to understanding brain function and the thousands of brain diseases and disorders that affect both humans and animals. Treatments for stroke, depression, and drug addiction are just a few examples of developments made by this research. Learn more.

A gene controls neuronal traffic in the assembly of this electrical circuit.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Vision requires teamwork. Nerve cells in the retina communicate with one another to create optimal messages to send to the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Animals in research are good for humans and the animals, too. Learn about the many benefits to this approach: kids edition.
  • Kids 4 Research
Animals in research are good for humans and the animals, too. Learn about the many benefits to this approach: teens edition.
  • Kids 4 Research
Animals in research are good for humans and the animals, too. Learn about the many benefits to this approach: teachers edition.
  • Kids 4 Research
It's alive! Learn about living systems and how you can incorporate them into your lessons.
  • National Institutes of Health
Why do scientists use animals in research? Use this resource to understand the process and benefits of animal research.
  • Understanding Animal Research
Human brain cell transplantation makes mice smart. The transplanted cells are not neurons and the cells communicate without using electricity.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Neurons in the brain and spinal cord cooperate to control complex movements, such as walking or swimming. Studying simple animals helps us understand how motion develops.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Neurons communicate with muscles in special kinds of connections called neuromuscular junctions. These exchanges help muscles to flex.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Whiskers give mice a tactile advantage. Scientists study the brains of mutant mice to learn about the development of specific brain regions, such as those involved in touch.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Dragonflies hover smoothly in part thanks to information collected by their eyes. Knowing these insects' retinal circuitry helps scientists understand how neurons process spatial data.
  • BrainFacts/SfN

3D Brain

An interactive brain map that you can rotate in a three-dimensional space.