Image of an eye inside of a color wheel
How the brain helps us see is a captivating subject in the world of neuroscience.
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The Hollow Face Illusion is spooky. The photo is of a flat sheet of plastic with a facial mask pushed in one side. In this case it’s the face of Albert Einstein*.
People with "photographic memory" are thought to be able to take and recall mental snapshots without error. But there is no evidence this type of memory exists.
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Vision requires teamwork. Nerve cells in the retina communicate with one another to create optimal messages to send to the brain.
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Our brains’ recognition of objects depends on their orientation. What do you see in this image?
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Hallucinations emerge when inner thoughts and expectations overpower sensory experience.
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Does this brain appear to be rotating? Rapid, involuntary eye movements paired with sharp contrast patterns in an image may cause the brain to perceive motion where there is none.
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Dragonflies hover smoothly in part thanks to information collected by their eyes. Knowing these insects' retinal circuitry helps scientists understand how neurons process spatial data.
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The brain receives information about the outside world via the senses. But how much of this information do we actually notice?
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Neurons in the eye turn light into electrical signals. How and where signals travel between these cells is thought to affect vision.
Synesthesia is a condition in which stimulation of one sense automatically evokes a perception in an unstimulated sense.
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The moment light meets the retina, the process of sight begins. About 60 years ago, scientists discovered that each vision cell’s receptive field is activated when light hits a tiny region in the center of the field and inhibited when light hits the area surrounding the center.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
To be able to see anything, eyes first need to process light. Vision begins with light passing through the cornea.
  • BrainFacts/SfN

3D Brain

An interactive brain map that you can rotate in a three-dimensional space.