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Many women experience hot flashes during menopause, but researchers are still working to uncover why they happen and how to treat them.
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Scientist Konstantina Kilteni explains the ins and outs of tickling, discusses the evolutionary purpose behind the sensation, and reveals why we can’t tickle ourselves.
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There are pain receptors — nociceptors — in different parts of the body but not the brain. Scientist Janet Bultitude breaks down what nociceptors are, how they work, and why the brain doesn’t have any.
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Three experts discuss photosensitive epilepsy and how flashing lights can trigger seizures.
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While it may feel like you’ve suffered an injury, this is a natural part of the body’s recovery from working out.
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For many people, the winter poses an onslaught of a seasonal depression known as seasonal affective disorder, or SAD.
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When light hits our eyes, it does more than help us see.
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Geneticists Huda Zoghbi and Adrian Bird discuss their groundbreaking work on the rare neurological disorder Rett syndrome.
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Your body is even more vigilant about regulating and tracking its internal temperature than the best weather channel.
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Donning a pair of 3-D glasses at the movies can us immerse in the action. But the technology that makes 3-D movies work has always existed inside our brains.
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Everyone experiences cramps. But we know less about their causes than you might expect.
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When the body’s temperature begins to rise, the brain’s health is on the line.
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