Emily K. Dilger, PhD

Emily is a former manager of BrainFacts.org. With a PhD in neuroscience, she is interested in exploring ways in which to engage children in science so as to encourage their life-long curiosity.

Articles by Emily K. Dilger, PhD

Studying the structure of neurons in the eye may help scientists prevent blindness due to glaucoma.
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Get involved in Brain Awareness Week with these ideas and resources!
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Secondary school students around the world are testing their knowledge in local Brain Bees.
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Neuroscientist Liz Burnett explains how animal models help scientists understand the healthy body and what goes wrong during disease.
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Even animals with simple nervous systems can help us learn about how our own nervous system works.
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Animal research has helped scientists better understand how repeated drug use changes the brain, resulting in new treatments for addiction.
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Animal models have been central to the discovery of drug treatments for such serious disorders as depression, anxiety disorders, and schizophrenia.
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Animal research has shown that long-term stress can damage the brain and has lead to drugs that are used to help treat patients with post-traumatic stress disorder.
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There is only one established clinical treatment for stroke, which was developed following experiments observing stroke in rabbits.
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Experiments using animals have helped researchers develop a number of therapies to slow the course of Multiple Sclerosis.
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Two major treatments for Parkinson's disease currently being used are the result of animal research, and they have greatly improved the quality of life of people with this disease.
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Research on dogs has enabled scientists to develop a potential cure that could someday restore vision to people – and dogs – with leber congenital amaurosis.
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