Dwayne Godwin

  • Wake Forest University

Dwayne Godwin is a Professor of Neurobiology and Neurology at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, where he studies epilepsy, sensory processing, withdrawal and PTSD. He coauthors a comic strip on brain topics for Scientific American Mind. The opinions expressed here are those of the author. You can find him on Twitter @BrainyActs.

Articles by Dwayne Godwin

The cost of sustaining vital research on brain diseases may be more than we’re willing to pay, but less than we imagine.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Stories about evolution are compelling because they fit with our very human need for a linear narrative, but evolution possesses distinctive non-linearities driven by its agent, natural selection.
Somewhere between single-celled organisms and human beings, brains evolved. Just why and how is still shrouded in mystery.
What were the biggest neuroscience stories of 2013?
  • BrainFacts/SfN
As the government shutdown nears the two week mark, it’s worth examining the effect of this latest political showdown on American science, and what this says about our collective values.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Memory is our most prized human treasure. It defines our sense of self, and our ability to navigate the world.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
On April 2nd 2013 President Obama formally unveiled the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) initiative.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Today, President Obama unveiled further details about the BRAIN initiative, a multibillion dollar project to unravel the secrets of the human brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
When anyone wants to support science, I’m in.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
A friend referred a video to me. It shows what is reported to be a real time magnetic resonance image of a singer, singing. And it’s amazing.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Humans have wrested deception from the evolutionary realm of self-preservation and imbued it with dark powers it was never intended to possess.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Our ability to access information is becoming nearly unlimited. But what does the loss of that gap in time between wondering and knowing mean to your brain?
  • BrainFacts/SfN