Brain Anatomy and Function

Image of neurons in synapse locations
Bacterial infections can make their way to the brain, where they can linger undetected.
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Your selections: Brain Anatomy and Function
What is an itch? That insistent tickle demanding that you cease whatever you are doing and claw with your fingernails at a particular spot on your skin.
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Regardless of personality or skill set, you use both the right and left hemispheres of your brain to perform everyday functions.
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Sometimes bigger really is better - but does the size of the brain, or brain bumps, mean what we think?
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Neurons in the brain and spinal cord cooperate to control complex movements, such as walking or swimming. Studying simple animals helps us understand how motion develops.
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People differ enormously as to what they consider to be stressful and how they respond to it. In general, short periods of moderate stress can actually be a good thing for the brain.
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Neurons communicate with muscles in special kinds of connections called neuromuscular junctions. These exchanges help muscles to flex.
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Whiskers give mice a tactile advantage. Scientists study the brains of mutant mice to learn about the development of specific brain regions, such as those involved in touch.
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A bedtime story about the process of brain development, as lovingly told to a baby.
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Dragonflies hover smoothly in part thanks to information collected by their eyes. Knowing these insects' retinal circuitry helps scientists understand how neurons process spatial data.
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The giant sea slug Apylsia has a simple nervous system that makes them a useful model for neuroscience research. They also have rows of tiny sharp teeth, which cover a tongue-like structure.
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Computer models of proteins involved in metabolism, the chemical reactions that sustain life, help researchers understand how disease affects their function.
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Star-shaped glial cells, sensibly named astrocytes, are found throughout the central nervous system. Scientists can use luminescence to make the cells actually glow as they communicate.
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3D Brain

An interactive brain map that you can rotate in a three-dimensional space.