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Your selections: Evolution
The scientist discusses his shocking research with electric fish.
  • People Behind the Science
  • 34 min
The human brain is curiously large given the size of our bodies, uses a huge amount of energy for its weight and has a bizarrely dense cerebral cortex. But: why?
  • TED
  • 14 min
Using amazing new technologies, scientists are discovering that the basic movements in one tiny fish can teach us big ideas about how the brain's circuitry works.
  • National Science Foundation
  • 5 min
Studying brain evolution sheds light on the unique features of the human brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Serpents are a storehouse of fascinating neuroscience.
Neuroscientist Daniel Wolpert starts from a surprising premise: the brain evolved, not to think or feel, but to control movement.
  • TED
  • 20 min
Neuroscientists have long understood that the cerebellum is important for controlling bodily movements, by making them more fluid and coordinated, but researchers have also long appreciated that cerebellum does much more.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Researchers discover that even non-flying dinosaurs had brains with the motor and visual capabilities necessary to take wing.
  • Science Friday
  • 9 min
Why do we get motion sickness? Learn what this condition has to do with the brain and your senses in this video.
  • TED
Humans possess cognitive abilities very different from other creatures, thanks to a number of unusual features of our brains.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Stories about evolution are compelling because they fit with our very human need for a linear narrative, but evolution possesses distinctive non-linearities driven by its agent, natural selection.
Somewhere between single-celled organisms and human beings, brains evolved. Just why and how is still shrouded in mystery.