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What gives you goosebumps? Discover the science behind fear and what makes it such a powerful emotional response.
  • California Science Center
Fear is a powerful emotion. Learn how your brain responds when fear takes over.
  • California Science Center
Our brains’ recognition of objects depends on their orientation. What do you see in this image?
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Learn how your brain takes in your surroundings. These fun, hand-on group activities are great for primary students.
  • University of New England Center for Excellence in the Neurosciences
Hallucinations emerge when inner thoughts and expectations overpower sensory experience.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The main active ingredient in marijuana alters the normal communication between cells and circuits in the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Our ability to access information is becoming nearly unlimited. But what does the loss of that gap in time between wondering and knowing mean to your brain?
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Just like other cells in the body, brain cells use a form of sugar called glucose to fuel their activities. This energy comes from the foods we consume daily, and is regularly delivered to brain cells through the blood.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Neurons in the brain and spinal cord cooperate to control complex movements, such as walking or swimming. Studying simple animals helps us understand how motion develops.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
People differ enormously as to what they consider to be stressful and how they respond to it. In general, short periods of moderate stress can actually be a good thing for the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Does this brain appear to be rotating? Rapid, involuntary eye movements paired with sharp contrast patterns in an image may cause the brain to perceive motion where there is none.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Whiskers give mice a tactile advantage. Scientists study the brains of mutant mice to learn about the development of specific brain regions, such as those involved in touch.
  • BrainFacts/SfN