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Retinal ganglion cells are the conduit between the eyes and the brain.
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A network of supporting cells, called oligodendrocytes, acts as electricians of the brain.
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One tiny region, the fovea, has more cells — and therefore sharper vision — than the rest of the eye.
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The brain may direct movement, but it’s motor neurons that make it happen.
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Whether it’s a rainbow or a rose, these bristle-like cells let you know what colors you’re seeing.
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Deiter’s cells stabilize the inner ear’s hair cells with crossbeam-like support.
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Schwann cells insulate the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord, speeding up neural signaling.
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The Italian-American neurologist discovered a protein neurons need to grow.
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From cell metabolism to electrical signaling, the multitasking mineral does it all.
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It takes two photoreceptors in the eye, differing in size and function but working together, to let us see the world.
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Many of the retina’s cells act as supporting characters to the neuron chains responsible for handling visual information.
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The sense of touch conveys important social information and tells you when something is dangerous by letting you feel pain.
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