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Shame and guilt feel awful, but they do serve a good purpose: to make you be a better human.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Scientists are trying to figure out why so many of us want to pinch babies’ chubby cheeks and squeeze adorable puppies.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The junction between the cortex and the brainstem highlights the center of our emotions.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
We may be hardwired to look at spiders and snakes differently than other critters, but we aren’t born afraid of them.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
From pregnancy to parenthood, child-rearing shapes the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The prolonged stress a child experiences by being separated from their parents has lasting implications for their mental health and the generations after them.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Our capacity to learn and remember and to feel a range of emotions all arise from signaling in distinct regions of the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
It’s hard to describe what an emotion is — let alone how many of them there are or whether everyone experiences the same ones. But we do know this: emotions arise from activity in distinct parts of the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Charles A. Nelson answers your questions on how separation is harmful to a child’s developing brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Ray Dolan, Peter Dayan, Wolfram Schultz have demonstrated how the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine helps us learn.
  • The Brain Prize
  • 5 min
There’s no mistaking a broken heart for a broken bone — but our brains might look at both kinds of pain the same way.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Where do love ballads and beautiful poetry come from? What about the fear of heights and spiders? It’s all in the brain! In this lesson, explore the wonders of emotions and the brain with your students.
  • BrainFacts/SfN