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Scientists are exploring how neural-digital technologies can expand the human experience. This endeavor raises crucial ethical questions.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 17 min
Advancements in neuroscience have answered some big questions about ourselves — they have also posed even bigger questions about our society.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Experts in neuroscience and the law answer questions about solitary confinement and how it affects the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 20 min
This panel discusses the implications of solitary confinement with a neurobiologist, a physician, a lawyer, and an individual held in solitary for 29 years.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Jules Lobel has spent years using neuroscience studies in court to argue and prove that solitary confinement should be considered cruel and unusual punishment.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 14 min
Robert King spent 29 years in solitary confinement for a crime he didn’t commit. He was freed in 2001 when a court reversed his conviction — but the effects of his isolation linger.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Huda Akil, professor of psychiatry at the University of Michigan, explains the many ways that the stress of chronic isolation, especially solitary confinement, affects the brain and behavior.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 18 min
Richard J. Smeyne discusses recent research that reveals how solitary confinement can cause physical damage to the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 16 min
As social animals, our health depends on interactions with others. If placed in isolation, without those connections, our physical and mental health take a hit.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 18 min
Robert King, a member of the Angola 3, shares how his 29 years in solitary confinement changed the course of his life forever.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 18 min
Understanding the brain science behind human behavior can help us create a fairer legal system.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
As neurolaw grows at remarkable pace, judges are still determining how, whether, and when to support brain science in the courtroom.
  • BrainFacts/SfN