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If you were blind since birth and learned how to identify objects by your sense of touch, could you distinguish those objects by sight alone if your vision was suddenly restored?
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 18 min
Optic vesicles grow into an empty pathway where the brain lays wiring that becomes the optic nerve.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Cognitive scientist, Marlene Behrmann, investigates what can be learned about visual perception through injury and disorders.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Sense organs are the brain’s windows to the outside world.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
It takes two photoreceptors in the eye, differing in size and function but working together, to let us see the world.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Many of the retina’s cells act as supporting characters to the neuron chains responsible for handling visual information.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Many cells and molecules work together to help you see the world around you.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
We all have a blind spot.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Of the estimated 80 million Americans who will be 65 and older in 2050, 6.3 million will be impacted by glaucoma.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Fish eyes’ stored stem cells could give clues to develop potential therapies for an injured mammalian eye.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
People with aphantasia are incapable of forming mental images.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 3 min
Brain imaging and computer modeling evidence pinpoints the area of the brain that perceives environmental boundaries — and stops you from running into them.
  • BrainFacts/SfN