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And other neuroscience news for the week of June 15, 2020
  • BrainFacts/SfN
These shortsighted insects see an unimaginably vibrant world.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
And other neuroscience news for the week of May 18, 2020.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Artificial intelligence is helping neuroscientists understand human vision — which, in turn, can help engineers create better technologies.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Retinal ganglion cells are the conduit between the eyes and the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
One tiny region, the fovea, has more cells — and therefore sharper vision — than the rest of the eye.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Whether it’s a rainbow or a rose, these bristle-like cells let you know what colors you’re seeing.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
If you were blind since birth and learned how to identify objects by your sense of touch, could you distinguish those objects by sight alone if your vision was suddenly restored?
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 18 min
Optic vesicles grow into an empty pathway where the brain lays wiring that becomes the optic nerve.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Cognitive scientist, Marlene Behrmann, investigates what can be learned about visual perception through injury and disorders.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Sense organs are the brain’s windows to the outside world.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
It takes two photoreceptors in the eye, differing in size and function but working together, to let us see the world.
  • BrainFacts/SfN