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Your selections: Vision
These five common fish see the world a little differently than we do.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The identification of the fusiform face area more than two decades ago continues to yield insight into human visual perception and cognition.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Mantis Shrimp maintain their incredible sense of sight earlier in development than we may have realized.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Some arousal states direct the brain’s sensory processing toward a limited number of stimuli.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Test your knowledge about senses, diseases, and movements.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
On top of restoring vision, cataracts surgery may help preserve cognitive functioning in older adults.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
In a small, proof-of-concept study, researchers found stimulating the brain with magnets helped people perceive objects faster.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Access to artificial light allows us to shift our sleep and wake cycles away from the natural daylight schedule.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Humans can find faces in many things because of our fusiform gyrus.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The brain’s fusiform face area helps you find your friend in a crowd.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
A picture of a dress captured the attention of millions around the world and raised a fundamental question – how could we perceive the same thing so differently?
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Our knack for recognizing faces helps us communicate with those around us and learn about our environment.
  • BrainFacts/SfN