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It is important to pay attention to our mental health and to understand how the brain is involved.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Some types of therpy can not only reduce stress and anxiety but also physically change the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 4 min
It’s not just hormones that explain teen behavior. Environment and social interaction play a role, too.
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The simple act of sitting quietly and focusing on your breath may change your brain — and improve your mental health.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 3 min
Use our Guess the Disorder Quiz and Ask an Expert articles to help your students learn more about mental disorders and the brain.
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Disrupting circadian rhythms is linked to mood disorders, and chronic illnesses. Neuroscientists are teasing apart how.
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Most people feel a little anxious when they go to the doctor. Some see their blood pressure spike. Andrew Sherwood explains why.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Feeling panic is a natural response to danger. The problem comes when you feel panic without a threat.
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Barbara Rothbaum answers your questions about phobias and therapies.
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Jeremy Jamieson answers your questions on the stress response and resilience.
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Thomas G. Schulze answers your questions about bipolar disorder and treatments.
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Hormonal changes following delivery, coupled with the added stress of caring for an infant round-the-clock, make the postpartum a time of heightened vulnerability to depression.
  • BrainFacts/SfN