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Your selections: Thinking and Awareness
Despite the swanky name, the cocktail party problem has nothing to do with martinis. It’s a term scientists use to refer to the brain’s ability to tune in to a single voice.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Our brains’ recognition of objects depends on their orientation. What do you see in this image?
  • BrainFacts/SfN
If you’ve ever been backpacking you know the problem neuroscientist Mathias Pessiglione and his colleagues are interested in solving: when to take a break.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Our ability to access information is becoming nearly unlimited. But what does the loss of that gap in time between wondering and knowing mean to your brain?
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Research into the razor-sharp hearing of barn owls reveals how we create mental maps of space and may lead to hearing loss solutions.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
When two tasks demand competing attention, there is generally a switching that occurs between the neural processes involved, rather than concurrent processing as may be expected with true multitasking.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Neuroethics will draw from the experience of bioethics in handling scientific communication with the media and responsible transfer of knowledge from basic science to profit-driven venture.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
From the first large studies monitoring the mental functioning of the same group of healthy humans over many years, scientists have uncovered unexpected results.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
In this lesson by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, students learn the likely causes of distracted driving and its possible effects.
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science
Every morning we wake up and regain consciousness, but what exactly is it that we regain? Neuroscientist Antonio Damasio uses this question to give us a glimpse into how our brains create our sense of self.
  • TED
  • 19 min
In an attempt to put mind over matter, researchers are beginning to decipher what exactly is happening in our brains when we are making decisions.
  • The Kavli Foundation
Listening to classical music hasn't been shown to improve intelligence in children or adults.
  • BrainFacts/SfN