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In a small, proof-of-concept study, researchers found stimulating the brain with magnets helped people perceive objects faster.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
A picture of a dress captured the attention of millions around the world and raised a fundamental question – how could we perceive the same thing so differently?
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Brain imaging and computer modeling evidence pinpoints the area of the brain that perceives environmental boundaries — and stops you from running into them.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The question may sound bizarre, but for people with synesthesia, days of the week might have their own colors, shapes, textures — even smells!
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 4 min
Hallucinations happen when people see, hear, feel, or otherwise sense things that are not real, but appear to be very real and part of the surrounding environment.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
How could the color of a dress be open to interpretation? Learn more about the neuroscience behind the internet phenomenon in the third-place video from the 2016 Brain Awareness Video Contest.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Your eyes can play tricks on you, and visual illusions take advantage of these glitches in our perception.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
How do the various wavelengths of visible light become what we know as color?
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Neuroscientists are studying how the brain determines what information is most important in everyday scenes.
  • National Science Foundation
Renowned neurologist and author Oliver Sacks passed away this weekend. In this video, he discusses Charles Bonnet syndrome and hallucinations.
  • TED
Social media has been on fire with a debate – not over ISIS, healthcare or global warming – but over the perceived color of a dress.
A shark’s ability to home in on the scent of blood is legendary, but many people are surprised to learn that sharks have a stealthy sixth sense to find prey and explore the world around them.
  • BrainFacts/SfN