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Some neuroscientists think psychedelic drugs and the hallucinations they induce could help reveal how the brain generates our perceptions of the world around us — and of ourselves.
  • Knowable Magazine
It feels like falling asleep, but anesthesia and snoozing are completely different. Neuroscientist and anesthesiologist Emery Brown explains what makes them different.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Scientists are beginning to unravel the science of so-called “brain tingles.”
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Several timekeeping brain regions work together to create our perception of time.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Brain imaging and computer modeling evidence pinpoints the area of the brain that perceives environmental boundaries — and stops you from running into them.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The question may sound bizarre, but for people with synesthesia, days of the week might have their own colors, shapes, textures — even smells!
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 4 min
Hallucinations happen when people see, hear, feel, or otherwise sense things that are not real, but appear to be very real and part of the surrounding environment.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The video is a fun explanation of the neurological basis of the phantom limb syndrome.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 3 min
How could the color of a dress be open to interpretation? Learn more about the neuroscience behind the internet phenomenon in the third-place video from the 2016 Brain Awareness Video Contest.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Learn about the neuroscience behind synesthesia in this video which won first place in the 2016 Brain Awareness Video Contest.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 5 min
Your eyes can play tricks on you, and visual illusions take advantage of these glitches in our perception.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Proprioception is your sense of your body’s position in space, and without it you wouldn’t be able to walk or scratch your nose with your eyes closed.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 5 min