Explore

A strong blow or rough rocking of the head can cause the brain to impact with the skull, resulting in traumatic brain injury.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Autopsies of American football players’ brains built our current understanding of the hazards associated with repeated blows to the head.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Christopher Giza, professor of pediatric neurology and neurosurgery, explains what happens when you’re knocked out.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Research shows that even mild TBI can cause permanent brain changes in young adults – and that the damage worsens over time.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
There’s a lot going on inside the brain of a World Cup athlete — and a lot that could go wrong with a hard hit or blow to the head.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Sports-related head injuries can pose long-term consequences for athletes.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
What sport has the highest reported rate of severe concussions? Hint: it is not football.
  • Ohio University
A blood test may help athletes gauge concussion recovery.
  • Science Friday
  • 17 min
Harvey Levin, a professor at Baylor College of Medicine, defines the levels of brain injury. He also discusses the increasing numbers of head injuries and recovery period.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Robert Stern, a professor at Boston University School of Medicine, talks about the long-term effects of repetitive head impacts, specifically in football and boxers.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 31 min
Lisa Brenner, an associate professor at the University of Colorado, talks about traumatic brain injury in military personnel and symptoms that many people experience when they've had a head injury.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 21 min
Concussions don't always show up on brain scans. But, whether or not we can see it, the damage is there.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 4 min