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A growing body of research now shows that poverty changes the way children’s brains develop, shrinking parts of the brain essential for memory, planning, and decision-making.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Have you wondered the impact socioeconomic status can have on children's developing brains?
  • TED
While trigger warnings may seem helpful, research shows this may not be the case.
  • Inside Higher Ed
With insights from neuroscience, behavioral economics research seeks to understand why people are often predictably irrational when it comes to economic decision-making.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 4 min
Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the U.S. And, the rate is increasing.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Worldwide, more than 175 million people have a substance use disorder.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Around the world, women are more likely than men to be diagnosed with depression.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Advancements in neuroscience have answered some big questions about ourselves — they have also posed even bigger questions about our society.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Experts in neuroscience and the law answer questions about solitary confinement and how it affects the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 20 min
This panel discusses the implications of solitary confinement with a neurobiologist, a physician, a lawyer, and an individual held in solitary for 29 years.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Jules Lobel has spent years using neuroscience studies in court to argue and prove that solitary confinement should be considered cruel and unusual punishment.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 14 min
Robert King spent 29 years in solitary confinement for a crime he didn’t commit. He was freed in 2001 when a court reversed his conviction — but the effects of his isolation linger.
  • BrainFacts/SfN