Explore

Your selections: Learning and Memory > Memory
And other neuroscience news for the week of October 26, 2020.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
For more than 100 years, neuroscientists have searched for memory’s physical form. Finding it would answer philosophical and scientific questions about our minds.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
People with aphantasia are incapable of forming mental images.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 3 min
The junction between the cortex and the brainstem highlights the center of our emotions.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
There are many little problems to handle well before your day starts, but your brain is there to get you through it all.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Recalling skills often depends on returning to your state of mind — or environment — where you first learned it.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 8 min
Our capacity to learn and remember and to feel a range of emotions all arise from signaling in distinct regions of the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Scientists think déjà vu might be a hiccup in the process of memory consolidation.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 5 min
Your ability to recall the color of your childhood home depends on long-lasting changes to the connections between nerve cells.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Scientists continue to learn about the neurobiology and architecture of the different types of memory.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
A 29-year-old man with amnesia taught neuroscientists a lot about memory.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Do you ever wonder why it is so hard to learn something new? It's due in part to heavy cognitive load. Learn more in this Roundup.
  • BrainFacts/SfN