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Our sleep schedules aren’t simply personal preferences — they’re innate, biological predispositions that affect our physical and mental health.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The idea that waking a sleepwalker could give them a heart attack or cause brain damage is a myth. But try not to wake them if you don’t have to.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Learning new information isn’t quite so easy as popping in headphones and passively listening to taped lectures while you slumber — not yet, anyway.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The terrifying experience is not paranormal activity but a common neurological phenomenon.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 3 min
Teens’ nocturnal lifestyles are more than a personal preference — dramatic hormonal changes during puberty alter the brain circuits that regulate sleep.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Sleep deprivation puts the brain on high alert, unable to discern a well-natured grin from a threatening scowl.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Jet lag, irregular sleep schedules, and exposure to artificial light throw our internal clocks out of whack. When that happens, our health suffers.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Sun-seeking brain cells keep the sleep cycle in balance.
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The release of the “vampire hormone” lets the body know when it’s time to sleep.
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Billionths of a meter thick yet tough as silk or steel, these unwanted threads are hard to destroy.
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How many times have you chosen another activity over sleep? Next time, think again, and your healthier brain will thank you.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Hearing words that evoke visions of color or seeing letters that have gender are just a few examples of experiencing synesthesia. Jessica Johnson investigates this tangling of the senses.
  • BrainFacts/SfN