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Ceiling height and window light don’t just concern interior designers. Neuroscientists are examining how room design evokes specific cognitive responses.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Playing a musical instrument is the brain equivalent of a full-body workout.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Rhythms drive music-playing and dancing as well as speaking and walking.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Whether we observe or create, the arts change our brains. The emerging field of neuroaethetics may help us understand how and why.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Brain breaks help children by replenishing attention, improving learning, and boosting creativity. But, it turns out we might all benefit from giving our brains more downtime. Here’s why.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Neuroscience has begun to trace the complex network of cognitive and neural processes that come together to create sudden insight.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
This video shows how the right-and-left-brained belief came to be and why it is a myth.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 4 min
Daniel Levitin, professor of neuroscience at McGill University, describes the way that learning a musical instrument alters and strengthens key areas of the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 22 min
Nina Kraus, professor at Northwestern University, discusses how our brains process sound, and how making music can help offset language deficiencies.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 25 min
Ping Ho, founder and director of UCLArts and Healing, describes how art education is a matter of public health.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Teaching young people how to play music and create art can have lasting benefits for the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The highly connected region is active not only driving motor movements but also during cognitive tasks.
  • The Dana Foundation