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New research shows that the Zika virus can infect neural stem cells in the adult brain.
In an interesting article in the magazine Nautilus, J.B. MacKinnon, reports that a brain scan (fMRI) of free solo climber, Alex Honnold’s brain explains why he is so willing to risk his life to climb rocks without a rope.
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There's been a lot of discussion on social media of a recent paper in PNAS by Anders Eklund, Tom Nichols, and Hans Knutsson. Cluster failure: Why fMRI inferences for spatial extent have inflated false-positive rates Even Science magazine felt they needed to address it.
“He slimed me!” Venkman spits out in disgust, writhing in sticky ectoplasm in a memorable scene from the 1984 movie Ghostbusters.
Research to understand and cure disease is widely appreciated, but there is a larger unmet need to understand the neuroscience of violence.
Dr. Jerald Harris is Professor of Geology and Director of Paleontology at Dixie State College, and an expert in the esoteric science of identifying fossil footprints (ichnology). From these empty impressions in stone, he brings to life the extinct animals that made them millions of years before man first walked the earth.
Long-necked Sauropods, like Brontosaurus, were the largest animals on earth, but their brain, not their leg strength, is what kept them from getting any bigger.
The diagnosis of the mental state of public figures is an overwhelming impulse for some, particularly in the current political season where terms like “narcissism”, “pathological liar”, and “megalomaniac” are now a routine part of the discourse.
One of the fundamental questions motivating neuroscientists is to understand the relationship between brain activity and lived experience: how the different parts of the brain work together to produce the key ingredients for behavior: memory, feeling, thinking and imagination.
Cochlear implants have restored hearing to thousands of deaf people, but what about when deafness is caused by a damaged cochlea or nonfunctional auditory nerve? A possible solution is to bypass the cochlea and stimulate the brain directly.
We are on the brink of a new understanding of the neuroscience of violence. Like detectives slipping a fiber optic camera under a door, neuroscientists insert a fiber optic microcamera into the brain of an experimental animal and watch the neural circuits of rage respond during violent behavior.
Thousands of people are captivated by the live video stream of a pair of bald eagles, named Mr. President and The First Lady, nesting on top of a Tulip Poplar tree at the U.S. National Arboretum.