Teaching Technique

Learning Styles Hurt Learning

  • Published17 Oct 2016
  • Reviewed20 Oct 2016
  • Author
  • Source BrainFacts/SfN

One current brain myth posits that if students are struggling to learn, it might be because they are not being taught in a mode that meshes with their preferred learning style. As such, educators and professional development leaders devote time and resources assessing students’ learning styles and developing instruction to match.

But research shows that educators may actually be doing a disservice to learners by continually accommodating their learning-style preferences. In this webinar, find out more about the science behind learning styles and discover the many free resources available for educators on BrainFacts.org.


Speakers:

Photo of Terrence J. Sejnowski

Moderator: Terrence Sejnowski, PhD

Terrence Sejnowski is a computational neuroscientist whose goal is to understand the principles that link brain to behavior. He is an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, holds the Francis Crick Chair at The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, and is a professor of biology at the University of California, San Diego, where he is co-director of the Institute for Neural Computation and co-director of the NSF Temporal Dynamics of Learning Center.

Photo of Beth A. Rogowsky, Ed.D.

Speaker: Beth A. Rogowsky, Ed.D.

Beth A. Rogowsky has 14 years of classroom experience teaching English language arts to middle level learners in both rural and urban settings. Dr. Rogowsky completed 3 years of postdoctoral training at the Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience at Rutgers University linking her previous teaching experience with the science of learning. She seeks to conduct scientific research that improves our understanding of how students learn as well as student outcomes. Currently, Dr. Rogowsky is an Assistant Professor in the College of Education at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.

Content Provided By

BrainFacts/SfN