Celebrating Women in Neuroscience

  • Published6 Mar 2020
  • Author Juliet M. Beverly
  • Source BrainFacts/SfN
portrait of rita levi montalcini

Rita Levi-Montalcini

The Italian-American neurologist discovered a protein neurons need to grow.

Becker Medical Library, Washington University School of Medicine
portrait of rita levi montalcini
Video still of Diane Lipscombe in a black turtleneck

Diane Lipscombe: Investigating Gates and Messengers in the Brain

A passion for puzzles and mystery novels laid the landscape for Diane Lipscombe to apply experiences from childhood hobbies to her neuroscience career. Today, she investigates calcium ion channels, the gate keepers of most of the signals that are essential for our brain and nervous system to function.

Video still of Diane Lipscombe in a black turtleneck
Katie Tschida: From Telescopes to Microscopes

Katie Tschida: From Telescopes to Microscopes

The researcher discusses her fascination with the stars and what songbirds can teach us about human language.

Katie Tschida: From Telescopes to Microscopes
Photo of Bernice Grafstein, first woman to become president of the Society for Neuroscience (SfN).

Bernice Grafstein: Advancing the Field and the Next Generation

The neuroscientist discusses her pioneering research and her commitment to helping women in science succeed.

The Society for Neuroscience
Photo of Bernice Grafstein, first woman to become president of the Society for Neuroscience (SfN).

History isn’t only about honoring the past or making ready for the future — it’s also about looking at the present. In celebration of Women’s History Month, explore some of the contributions women have made to the field of neuroscience yesterday, today, and tomorrow.

See other profiles of women conducting neuroscience research in everything from bats, to big data, and the BRAIN Initiative.

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BrainFacts/SfN