Emotions, Stress & Anxiety

Image of children with drawn faces on paper in front of their faces
It’s hard to describe what an emotion is — let alone how many of them there are or whether everyone experiences the same ones. But we do know this: emotions arise from activity in distinct parts of the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
What is it about smell that evokes such powerful memories? Find out in this video which earned an honorable mention in the 2016 Brain Awareness Video Contest.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 4 min
In an interesting article in the magazine Nautilus, J.B. MacKinnon, reports that a brain scan (fMRI) of free solo climber, Alex Honnold’s brain explains why he is so willing to risk his life to climb rocks without a rope.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
When a gentle glow feels like a spotlight and everyday sounds hurt your ears, life can get anxious and painful. But there may be an upside to being highly sensitive.
  • Wellcome Trust
Research to understand and cure disease is widely appreciated, but there is a larger unmet need to understand the neuroscience of violence.
Its supposed to help keep your body healthy in stressful situations. But the constant stress of our everyday lives means we're getting overexposed to cortisol.
  • American Chemical Society
  • 3 min
What is research uncovering about this anxiety disorder?
  • BrainFacts/SfN
We are on the brink of a new understanding of the neuroscience of violence. Like detectives slipping a fiber optic camera under a door, neuroscientists insert a fiber optic microcamera into the brain of an experimental animal and watch the neural circuits of rage respond during violent behavior.
Think back to a really vivid memory. Got it? Now try to remember what you had for lunch three weeks ago. That second memory probably isn’t as strong—but why not?
  • TED
  • 4 min
New research reported in the journal Psychological Medicine, concludes that continued use of cannabis causes violent behavior as a direct result of changes in brain function that are caused by smoking marijuana over many years.
For people with seasonal affective disorder, the changing seasons can make them sadder than most, to the point of depression. Why does this happen? And what can we do about it?
  • American Chemical Society
  • 4 min
While scientists are learning how important emotional input is to nearly every aspect of cognition, behavior, and disease, understanding how that works is a tangled puzzle.
  • The Dana Foundation
One woman with a rare disease taught scientists about fear, by being fearless.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 8 min

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