Emotions, Stress & Anxiety

Image of children with drawn faces on paper in front of their faces
It’s hard to describe what an emotion is — let alone how many of them there are or whether everyone experiences the same ones. But we do know this: emotions arise from activity in distinct parts of the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
In response to signals from a brain region called the hypothalamus, the adrenal glands secrete glucocorticoids, hormones that produce an array of effects in response to stress.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Extreme stressors such as trauma in combat, being a victim of assault or sexual abuse, or experiencing or witnessing a crime can lead to a form of stress that can last a lifetime.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Considered the most common mental illnesses, anxiety disorders affect an estimated 18 percent of the adult population in a given year, or 40 million Americans.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
What do standing frustrated in a supermarket checkout line or sitting in a traffic jam have in common with fleeing predators, as was done in the early days of human beings?
  • BrainFacts/SfN
A stressful situation activates three major communication systems in the brain, all of which regulate bodily functions.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The ability to react quickly in response to threatening events has been with us since the time of our earliest ancestors.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
In this two-part lesson by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, students learn about gelotology (the science of laughter) and its benefits to our social, mental, and physical well-being.
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science
What's going on inside the teenage brain? This Frontline television special explores how science may unlock answers to that question.
  • PBS

3D Brain

An interactive brain map that you can rotate in a three-dimensional space.