Hearing

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Image of hair cells
You have this tiny corkscrew to thank for every song you’ve ever heard.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Your selections: Hearing
Specialized cells in the inner ear turn vibrations in the air into what we perceive as sound. However, over time or after prolonged exposure to loud noises, these cells can become damaged and die, leading to hearing loss.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Cochlear implants have restored hearing to thousands of deaf people, but what about when deafness is caused by a damaged cochlea or nonfunctional auditory nerve? A possible solution is to bypass the cochlea and stimulate the brain directly.
The cochlea is the place where sound waves are converted to beautiful music.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Special cells in the inner ear turn vibrations in the air into what we perceive as sound.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
New technologies are giving children who are deaf a chance to hear.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 10 min
Possible links between impaired hearing and loss of cognitive abilities raise the tantalizing possibility that restoring hearing could slow cognitive decline.
  • The Dana Foundation
Musician and researcher Charles Limb wondered how the brain works during musical improvisation — so he put jazz musicians and rappers in an fMRI to find out. 
  • TED
  • 16 min
The cochlear implant is a near-miraculous device, widely considered the most effective brain-machine interface technology yet developed. Now, researchers are working to make this very good implant even better.
  • The Dana Foundation
Playing a musical instrument can do wonders for our brains. But how does it affect our hearing later on in life?
  • National Science Foundation
What if the number 7 tasted like chocolate? What if Monday was purple? This is what life is like for someone with synesthesia. Learn more about this fascinating neurological trait with this video.
  • TED
  • 4 min
Why do we get motion sickness? Learn what this condition has to do with the brain and your senses in this video.
  • TED
Fish, frogs, and birds are able to recover from damage to cells in the inner ear that cause permanent hearing loss in people. What makes them different?
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 1 min

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