Image of an eye inside of a color wheel
How the brain helps us see is a captivating subject in the world of neuroscience.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The question may sound bizarre, but for people with synesthesia, days of the week might have their own colors, shapes, textures — even smells!
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 4 min
Our culture affects what we eat, what we wear, and what language we speak. However, where we grow up in the world may also affect certain aspects of how our brains work.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
  • 4 min
Welcome to the crossroads of the optic nerves.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
With more than half of its tiny brain devoted to sight, the fruit fly is a favorite animal model for scientists studying the visual system.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Advances in imaging technology allow scientists to look at the wiring that helps us understand our surroundings.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Neuroscientists are investigating how light triggers and exacerbates migraines.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
In the human retina, low-light-sensitive rods outnumber color-sensing cones by about twenty to one.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
It isn’t just your ears that allow you to hear, or just your eyes that allow you to see — it’s your brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Bundles of extra-long axons transmit signals from eyes to brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Check out these optical illusions and learn why your brain gets tricked!
  • BBC
Hearing words that evoke visions of color or seeing letters that have gender are just a few examples of experiencing synesthesia. Jessica Johnson investigates this tangling of the senses.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Is seeing believing? Look at these cards and see if you can tell which is bigger.
  • BrainFacts/SfN

3D Brain

An interactive brain map that you can rotate in a three-dimensional space.