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Pituitary Tumors

The pituitary is a small, bean-sized gland that is below the hypothalamus, a structure at the base of the brain, by a thread-like stalk that contains both blood vessels and nerves.  It controls a system of hormones in the body that regulate growth, metabolism, the stress response, and functions of the sex organs via the thyroid gland, adrenal gland, ovaries, and testes.  A pituitary tumor is an abnormal growth of cells within the pituitary gland.  Most pituitary tumors are benign, which means they are non-cancerous, grow slowly and do not spread to other parts of the body; however they can make the pituitary gland produce either too many or too few hormones, which can cause problems in the body. Tumors that make hormones are called functioning tumors, and they can cause a wide array of symptoms depending upon the hormone affected.  Tumors that don’t make hormones are called non-functioning tumors.  Their symptoms are directly related to their growth in size and include headaches, vision problems, nausea, and vomiting.  Diseases related to hormone abnormalities include Cushing’s disease, in which fat builds up in the face, back and chest, and the arms and legs become very thin; and acromegaly, a condition in which the hands, feet, and face are larger than normal.  Pituitary hormones that impact the sex hormones, such as estrogen and testosterone, can make a woman produce breast milk even though she is not pregnant or nursing, or cause a man to lose his sex drive or lower his sperm count.  Pituitary tumors often go undiagnosed because their symptoms resemble those of so many other more common diseases.

Treatment

Generally, treatment depends on the type of tumor, the size of the tumor, whether the tumor has invaded or pressed on surrounding structures, such as the brain and visual pathways, and the individual’s age and overall health.  Three types of treatment are used:  surgical removal of the tumor; radiation therapy, in which high-dose x-rays are used to kill the tumor cells; and drug therapy to shrink or destroy the tumor. Medications are also sometimes used to block the tumor from overproducing hormones.  For some people, removing the tumor will also stop the pituitary’s ability to produce a specific hormone.  These individuals will have to take synthetic hormones to replace the ones their pituitary gland no longer produces.

Prognosis

If diagnosed early enough, the prognosis is usually excellent.  If diagnosis is delayed, even a non-functioning tumor can cause problems if it grows large enough to press on the optic nerves, the brain, or the carotid arteries (the vessels that bring blood to the brain). Early diagnosis and treatment is the key to a good prognosis.

Research

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and other institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct research related to brain tumors, including pituitary tumors, in their laboratories at the NIH and also support research through grants to major medical institutions across the country.  Much of this research focuses on finding better ways to prevent, treat, and ultimately cure pituitary tumors.   

Organizations

American Brain Tumor Association (ABTA)
Funds researchers working toward breakthroughs in brain tumor diagnosis, treatment and care, and is a national organization providing comprehensive resources and serving the complex supportive care needs of brain tumor patients and caregivers from diagnosis through treatment and beyond.

8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave.
Suite 550
Chicago, IL 60631
ABTAcares@abta.org
http://www.abta.org
Tel: Chicago
Fax: 847-827-9918

National Brain Tumor Society
Nonprofit organization committed to finding a cure for brain tumors; its mission is to aggressively drive strategic research, advocate for public policies that meet the critical needs of the brain tumor community, and provide trusted patient information.

55 Chapel Street
Suite 200
Newton, MA 02458
questions@braintumor.org
http://www.braintumor.org
Tel: Newton
Fax: 617-924-9998

Pituitary Network Association
International non-profit organization for patients with pituitary disorders, their families, loved ones, and the physicians and health care providers who treat them.

P.O. Box 1958
Thousand Oaks, CA 91358
info@pituitary.org
http://www.pituitary.org
Tel: Thousand Oaks
Fax: 805-480-0633

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)

National Institutes of Health, DHHS
31 Center Drive, Rm. 2A32 MSC 2425
Bethesda, MD 20892-2425
http://www.nichd.nih.gov
Tel: Bethesda
Fax: 301-496-7101

Content Provided By

NINDS logo

NINDS Disorders is an index of neurological conditions provided by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. This valuable tool offers detailed descriptions, facts on treatment and prognosis, and patient organization contact information for over 500 identified neurological disorders.