Image of pioneer cells
These trailblazers strike out into various parts of the brain, laying down axons as they go.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Often considered the most important sense for humans, hearing allows us to communicate with each other by receiving sounds and interpreting speech.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
From remembering a friend's face to figuring out where you left your keys, the act of memory has many dimensions.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
How exactly are memories stored in brain cells? After years of study, much evidence supports the idea that memory involves a persistent change in synapses, the connections between neurons.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Why do we get sleepy? There are two main determining factors: the circadian system (time of day or night) and how long we have been awake.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
To be able to see anything, eyes first need to process light. Vision begins with light passing through the cornea.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
From the stands at sports events, we marvel at the actions of athletes. But in fact, each of us in our daily activities performs a host of complex, skilled movements that are just as remarkable.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Networks of spinal neurons also participate in controlling the alternating action of the legs during normal walking, maintaining posture, and, to a large degree, in all movements.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The cerebrum, the largest part of the human brain, is associated with higher order functioning, including the control of voluntary behavior. Thinking, perceiving, planning, and understanding language all lie within the cerebrum’s control.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The two halves of the nervous system work together in order for your body to properly communicate its sensations and needs.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The moment light meets the retina, the process of sight begins. About 60 years ago, scientists discovered that each vision cell’s receptive field is activated when light hits a tiny region in the center of the field and inhibited when light hits the area surrounding the center.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
This Web resource highlights the valuable role that animals play in biomedical research. The anatomy of the reward pathways in the human brain and the rat brain are compared to emphasize their similarities.
  • University of Utah
Here's your teaching manual to the inner workings of the brain. Download the entire PDF or use individual modules.
  • National Institute of Mental Health