Roundup

Under the Sea

  • Published11 Apr 2017
  • Reviewed11 Apr 2017
  • Author Michael W. Richardson
  • Source BrainFacts/SfN
Oval squid swimming in water, blending in to it's environment.

Hiding in Plain Sight

Cephalopods hide from predators and communicate with other members of their species in a unique way: by altering the color and texture of their skin.

Liu, et al. The Journal of Neuroscience, 2017.
Oval squid swimming in water, blending in to it's environment.
Scientists tickled turtles to generate a reflexive scratch reaction in their back legs. The above image shows a superimposed time-lapse of the scratch in action.

Testing Your Reflexes

What can a ticklish turtle teach us about how the spinal cord is organized?

Guzulaitis, et al. Journal of Neuroscience, 2014.
Scientists tickled turtles to generate a reflexive scratch reaction in their back legs. The above image shows a superimposed time-lapse of the scratch in action.
Squid tested for reactions to pain.

How Big Brains Handle Pain

Brainy mollusks are enhancing our understanding of injury in the animal kingdom.

Crook, et al. Journal of Neuroscience, 2013.
Squid tested for reactions to pain.
Giant pond snail.

The Taste of Snails

This tiny pond snail is teaching researchers about the changes that take place in the brain when long-term memories form.

Murakami, et al. Journal of Neuroscience, 2013.
Giant pond snail.
Image of the Week: A Slug's Life (sea slugs swimming)

A Slug's Life

Same neurons, different behaviors: How two slugs with similar brains can swim so differently.

Photo by Charuni A. Gunaratne.
Image of the Week: A Slug's Life (sea slugs swimming)
Jian Jing, Jonathan V. Sweedler, Elizabeth C. Cropper, Vera Alexeeva, Ji-Ho Park, et al. Feedforward Compensation Mediated by the Central and Peripheral Actions of a Single Neuropeptide Discovered Using Representational Difference Analysis . The Journal of Neuroscience, 8 December 2010, 30(49):16545-16558.

Sea Slug Teeth

The giant sea slug Apylsia has a simple nervous system that makes them a useful model for neuroscience research. They also have rows of tiny sharp teeth, which cover a tongue-like structure.

Credit: Courtesy, with permission: Jing, et al. The Journal of Neuroscience 2010.
Jian Jing, Jonathan V. Sweedler, Elizabeth C. Cropper, Vera Alexeeva, Ji-Ho Park, et al. Feedforward Compensation Mediated by the Central and Peripheral Actions of a Single Neuropeptide Discovered Using Representational Difference Analysis . The Journal of Neuroscience, 8 December 2010, 30(49):16545-16558.
Aaron M. Lambert, Joshua L. Bonkowsky, and Mark A. Masino. The Conserved Dopaminergic Diencephalospinal Tract Mediates Vertebrate Locomotor Development in Zebrafish Larvae. The Journal of Neuroscience, 26 September 2012, 32(39):13488-13500

Swimming Zebrafish

Neurons in the brain and spinal cord cooperate to control complex movements, such as walking or swimming. Studying simple animals helps us understand how motion develops.

Courtesy, with permission: Lambert, et al. The Journal of Neuroscience 2012.
Aaron M. Lambert, Joshua L. Bonkowsky, and Mark A. Masino. The Conserved Dopaminergic Diencephalospinal Tract Mediates Vertebrate Locomotor Development in Zebrafish Larvae. The Journal of Neuroscience, 26 September 2012, 32(39):13488-13500

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