Movement

Image of a nerve bundle
It doesn’t take brainpower to react to sudden danger; just a bit of spine.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Studying the nerve cells that alert fruit flies to danger may one day help scientists better understand diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and autism.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
What if the number 7 tasted like chocolate? What if Monday was purple? This is what life is like for someone with synesthesia. Learn more about this fascinating neurological trait with this video.
  • TED
  • 4 min
Motor neurons are crucial for movement, from the simplest step to the most complex dance.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The primate retina passes information about rapid movement to the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
There are likely advantages to having both left- and right-handed individuals in a population.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Scientists are rethinking the role of nerve endings once thought to be involved in providing spatial information to the brain.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Think fast! Figure out your brain’s reaction time with this activity.
  • Scientific American
Students are introduced to brain structure, neurotransmitters, hormones, and neural networks in this nine part lesson.
  • Baylor College of Medicine
Neurons in the brain and spinal cord cooperate to control complex movements, such as walking or swimming. Studying simple animals helps us understand how motion develops.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Neurons communicate with muscles in special kinds of connections called neuromuscular junctions. These exchanges help muscles to flex.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
The giant sea slug Apylsia has a simple nervous system that makes them a useful model for neuroscience research. They also have rows of tiny sharp teeth, which cover a tongue-like structure.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Tossing and turning generally occurs during very brief arousals from sleep during the night.
  • BrainFacts/SfN

3D Brain

An interactive brain map that you can rotate in a three-dimensional space.